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Vulnerability and Writing

All writers, every one of us, leave part of ourselves in our work. Sometimes this happens even when we're not aware of it. I generally write dark, Gothic, or action, thriller stuff. Recently I had an idea and knew I had to write it down. It wasn't like anything else I'd ever written. Young adult, romance, vulnerability, innocence. That wasn't in my wheelhouse. Then Shatter happened. It was a story I had to tell and I'm glad I did.

On the surface it's a fantastic tale of a girl made of glass: fragile, vulnerable, and willing to risk everything for the chance of not being alone in a world that treated her unfairly; for the chance to love and be loved. She didn't ask to be made of glass. The world was dangerous for her, but she is willing to risk everything for the real, human contact that she craves. Like everyone else, she wanted acceptance.

For me personally, this story struck a chord. My heart ached for Tamira Brannigan. I rooted for her. I reveled her laughter, and I cried when she cried. She will always be a special character to me.

For a long time I didn't realize why I was so attatched to the story, and felt it so hard. When I realized that it was a metaphor, or even a direct reflection of events that took place in my own life, I understood why it hit so hard. In the end, I dedicated the book to my daughter, Madison, and it may be the closest I'm ever actually able to get to putting her story on paper, but things always have a way of finding their way onto the page when the season is right.

Good, bad, or ugly, it is what it is. It is who I am. I write what I feel and I enjoyed writing Shatter immensely. I hope you enjoy reading it.

And the next time you see a little girl sitting alone, maybe her hair is a bit disheveled, maybe she doesn't quite fit in, lend her a smile. It may just be the thing she needs the most.

-John


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